Noble Ralts

Gallade Reconstruction

Another find I came across was a Gallade figure that looked like one from the Bandai Nintendo Box Toy Pokemon Clipping Figure Set 2 from 2007. It only cost a few bucks so I went ahead and bought it for my collection. Turns out, it was a Chinese bootleg copy made from some sort of rubber-like casting. Like most bootlegs, the paint job was lackluster and you probably also noticed the blank black spot in this first initial picture of it. But I decided to take a bad situation, and make it something worth keeping.


Bandai Nintendo Box Toy Pokemon Clipping Figure.jpg Before Image.JPG
The image on the left is the stock image of the Bandai Nintendo Box Toy Pokemon Clipping Figure Set 2 from Japan. The image on the right are my TOMY Gallade, and the Bootleg Clipping Figure to show a height comparison. The Binder clip is being used because the clipping bootleg could not stand on his own...at all. He needed support just to stand, so I knew that was something else I would need to fix.


workspace.JPG
Going back to the work bench, here is everything I planned to use to reconstruct the bootleg into something I would be proud to show off in my collection. I kept the TOMY figure near for color comparison for the painting stage.


leg1.JPG
So the first thing I noticed on this figure was severe damage done to his left leg. I would guess this was one of the casting break away points from the runners and sprue with most mass production injection molding processes. But since the figure was made of some rubber-like casting material, the cast wouldn't just breakaway. It looked like they just ripped the figures off the runner with force instead of cutting it away, and this tore out a chunk from the leg. So I needed to repair it before I can really get to work.


Leg Progress.png
I first had to cut away the shredded parts of the damaged area with my X-Acto Scoring Blade (it was my smallest), then I used the Mod Podge Dimensional Magic to fill the hole in the leg. I set it up on a binder clip to be balanced while it dried for the 3-hours it needed. Once it was dried and hardened, I used my X-Acto Scoring Blade to cut the excess Mod Podge down, and used sand paper to smooth it out and make it flush with the rest of the leg.

After the leg repairs were done, I looked over the figure carefully to identify any linking joints. I only identified one linking joint, at the neck where the head attached. This made it evident that this was more so a bootleg, since most figures are in 3 or more pieces for assembly and consistency in production. I tried the Hot Water trick first to try and separate the head from the body, but the amount of Super Glue and the stretchy consistency of the rubber-like material rendered that method null and void.

My only choice was to start with the paint and glue removal with my Acetone. As previously mentioned in my previous reconstruction post:
***Do be warned!!! Acetone is a volatile, and flammable liquid. Use only in a work place that is well ventilated, and away from high tempertures! Gloves are recommended too. If you do not wear gloves, be sure to wash your hands thoroughly after use, and do not touch your eyes!
If you are like me and want to repair or repaint a figure, and you want to remove paint and glue with acetone, you MUST take care with soft PVC toys. Acetone will act almost like an acid and will not only remove the paint, but it will start to break down the figure's surface with prolonged contact and exposure.


When I use Acetone, I only use a Q-Tip to apply it to the affected area, and then I use a pin or an X-Acto blade to gently scrape away the softening glue.
For removing paint, I simply dab away the paint with the Q-Tip. Never rub because that will push the acetone into the "skin" of the figure and eat away at the soft PVC. It does seem like a long and tedious process, and it is...but it is worth it for top quality finish and reduce the chance of permanent damage to the figure.

paint removal.JPG
Removing the paint didn't take long, but the glue that was holding the head to the body was a struggle. I did my best and after a couple hours of peeling and scraping with a T-pin (the area was too small and tight for an X-Acto blade), I finally got the head off. Much to my dismay...during this process, I discovered that the assembly of the bootleg...it appeared the painters glued the head on after everything was painted...and they spilled the glue over half the head, and halfway down the chest, and around the shoulders. That's why you still see paint on those areas of the figure in the image. It took a few more hours to get the glue removed from those pieces because it was just thick with glue. I finally managed to get all the glue and paint off without damaging the figure.


soap bath.JPG
After removing the paint and glue from the pieces, I submerged the pieces into a soap water bath. For this jar, I used Lemon Scented dish soap, about 2 tablespoons in warm water, and stirred with a spoon so that bubbles would not form. The pieces then settled and soaked for about an hour to neutralize and remove any acetone. I rinsed them with warm water afterwards.


find balance.JPG
After cleaning this figure, and drying it out, I started to figure out a way to balance the figure on his own two feet. The Hot Water option that can be used to re-position most soft and hard PVC plastics would not work for this rubber-like figure. My only option was to try and adjust the balance with its only other weight counter...adjusting the head position. It was a long shot, but I was surprised that turning the head about 90-degrees to the left, basically looking over his shoulder, worked! He was able to stand on his own, and honestly...the pose looked more dynamic, like he was ready to fight whatever was coming from behind, and I liked it!


start painting.JPG
Next I started on the paint job putting the head on a toothpick and using binder clips to hold the pieces steady while I worked. Using the TOMY figure as a reference, I had to mix some colors to get the crest and "horn" (that thing in the chest and back of Gallades and Gardevoirs. ;) ) colors just right.

paint 1.JPG
For the green, I selected to use a "Christmas Green". It was a little lighter than the standard Gallade green which was more of a Forest Green, but I selected to use the Christmas Green because it was a more...alive color to me. The body was painted an Eggshell White.

paint details.JPG
The mouth was so tiny, I used a thin quilting pin to "paint" the mouth with a thin black line to make it visible.

paint eye.JPG
The eyes "sclera" were painted with a different glossy white paint so that they will be more distinguishable after they are coated with a finish. The iris colors are the same color as the "Horn". I used my smallest brush, a 10/0 round size, to paint the colored iris and the black pupil. For the little white highlight dots, I again used the quilt pin to apply small dabs of white paint to finish the eyes.

Finish coating.JPG
After painting the pieces, I then put the head on to make sure the figure would still be able to balance with the head attached. Putting it on normally still caused it to fall over, so I turned it 90-degrees to the left again, and he stood perfectly. So it seemed to still work. Now I could start with a single coat of clear coat finish with my Tamiya X-22 on the pieces before I start to put the figure together.

painting done.JPG
The pieces looked very nice to me after I applied a single layer of clear coat finish to make sure the paint would not run when I attach the head. With this rubbery figure, I wanted to take no chances that the paint could be ruined, and I hoped the X-22 would harden the figure so it would hold its pose, and not bend like the soft rubber that it was. You can just barely see the different white colors between the face and the eye in this image too!

assemble head.JPG
I then turned to using my Mod Podge Dimensional Magic to seal the head onto the body with the 90-degree turn to the left. Again, I prefer to use this as a sealant versus Super Glue. It takes 3-hours to dry and seal, but it is strong and firm with a resin hold.

finished compare.JPG
After applying 3-clear coats appropriately, the figure was hardened and was was no longer as soft and flexible as it was, and it was able to stand perfectly balanced on its own. Standing next to the TOMY Gallade, the colors look good, even if the green is a slightly brighter green.


leg2.JPG repaired leg2.JPG
Remember that damaged leg? Take a look at it now! You can't even tell it had a hole in it! :D


Final Turnaround.png
And, for a final turn around, the finished figure! I actually liked this figure, despite the troubles to reconstruct it, it is a unique figure that comes from rare origins. Generally, you cannot find Bandai Nintendo Box Toy Pokemon Clipping Figures easily or at all, so the fact that there are bootlegs out there gives a little chance of getting at least a memory of these figures, and remembering they do...or did exist for fans in one way or another.

I actually got another just so I could make my own customized Shiny versions!
IMG_1342.JPG
Yes, I know, Shiny Gallades are a lighter Blue and have Orange "horns", but I like the darker Blue and red colors. To make them MORE shiny, I used metallic white paints for the body and silver for the crest! ^.^
Customization puts a little of your own little loves and desires to make the figures more unique and beloved by their owners. It is part of the reason I do these for some of my collection. I was debating doing the same to my Jakks Gallade figure...but I only have one. I will usually make custom colored shiny versions only if I have two figures so that one keeps the original appearance. Call it a pet-peeve, but I have to have one figure of the original color scheme before I can customize another in my collection.

Anyhoo! I hope this was helpful and enjoyable for others to read and learn! Feel free to post comments, critiques and any questions you may have regarding my reconstructions!
Noble Ralts

Wants List for Pokemon Collection

This is a post of the Pokemon figures and collectibles that I am looking to add to my collection. I mostly collect Gallade and Ralts figures and collectibles, and I'm always on the lookout for any new collectibles, but I'm not always the quickest or luckiest when it comes to getting them. So I tend to miss alot of hard to find items. ^^;

StarToys Shiny GalladeGardevoir Valentines.jpg
StarToys Xing Chen Ge Shiny Gallade + Gardevoir Valentines Day Sculpture


StarToys RaltsKirlia.jpg
StarToys Xing Chen Ge Shiny Ralts and Kirlia Valentines Day Sculpture

These sculptures from the StarToys Xing Chen Ge products sell out super fast, and these one's I've listed are actually part of a set that is most likely to be completed next year with the Gardevoir and Gallade Mega Evolutions. Here's what the set, and possible future sculpt will look like:
Current set.jpg
NextValentines_1024x1024.jpg


ralts pokedex.jpeg
Pokemon Pokedex Footprint Mini Figure - Ralts

I know this little guy is really rare, but I have hopes to find one...maybe two if possible! I cannot resist a cute little Ralts. ^_^


kirikizan Pokemon Pose W.jpg
pokemonposefigure_w.jpg
Kirikizan (Bisharp) Pokemon Pose Figure W

Been looking for this fella for years. It was only sold in Japan and is the only official Takara TOMY ARTs Bisharp figure. Funny story is I'm not looking for him for my collection. I am looking to get him for my best friend's collection. Bisharp is her favorite Pokemon, and she has almost all figures and plushies, and she's been sad that TOMY never released a figure for the fans. I discovered this Pokemon Pose Figure W dual figure candy sets through research, and I wanted to try to find it for her as a surprise...and it turns out this is one of the RAREST TOMY Pokemon figures. My searches have found that some collectors in Live Journal did trade and sell some of the figures in the past, so I am hoping to get lucky and find one for my friend at last.
Why doesn't she go out and find one for herself, you ask? Well...she's tried, but she lacks the resources and finances that I have. Besides, she's like a sister to me, so why wouldn't I want to give her a special gift if I have the chance?

I know it looks like a short list, but it could potentially grow as more toys, figures, and collectibles are made and released by the Pokemon company. Thanks for stopping by and having a look!
Noble Ralts

Pawniard Reconstruction

A while back, I encountered a poster in a group I am in who had questions about how to clean and repair their old Pokemon figures, and I had a thought that I could post some entries on how I go through repairs and customization of the figures I've obtained. So here is the first post to try and help others with some of my tips and tricks!

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I recently found a Pawniard Pokemon toy online for a few dollars. Knowing that Takara Tomy ARTS and other Pokemon production companies never made a Pawniard figure, I knew it was one of the made in China Fake Pokemon toys, but aesthetically it looked pretty good for a fake. The only problem was its paint job...or lack there of.

Before

So, I took it upon my self, and my experience with sculpting and crafts, to repaint the little critter. To do so, I had to take the little figure apart so I could properly clean and paint the parts as needed and to not paint over areas that didn't need it. To take the figure apart, I used a simple trick that works well when taking apart soft PVC figures for repairs or reconstruction. Hot Water! Just give the little figure a dip in hot water for about 30-seconds, and it becomes very soft and flexible, and will not crack and split as easily. Funny thing about this little figure, the Chinese fake toys are mostly made of a hard PVC Plastic, which will allow you to be a little more forceful when taking them apart, but care is still recommended.

Hot Water

In total, the figure was made of 10-parts. Poor little guy's face looked scared or terrified at what I was doing. ^^;;

Parts.JPG

I did discover by disassembling the figure, the factories that produce and assemble these toys loves to use Super Glue very liberally. You can see all the Super Glue Residue just caked on these pieces here;

Super Glue.JPG

To remove these chunks of glue, I turned to using my Acetone (Fingernail Polish Remover). It is my go to chemical for any paint and glue removal.

Super Glue2.JPG

***Do be warned!!! Acetone is a volatile, and flammable liquid. Use only in a work place that is well ventillated, and away from high tempertures! Gloves are recommended too. If you do not wear gloves, be sure to wash your hands thoroughly after use, and do not touch your eyes!
If you are like me and want to repair or repaint a figure, and you want to remove paint and glue with acetone, you MUST take care with soft PVC toys. Acetone will act almost like an acid and will not only remove the paint, but it will start to break down the figure's surface with prolonged contact and exposure.


When I use Acetone, I only use a Q-Tip to apply it to the affected area, and then I use a pin or an X-Acto blade to gently scrape away the softening glue.
For removing paint, I simply dab away the paint with the Q-Tip. Never rub because that will push the acetone into the "skin" of the figure and eat away at the soft PVC. It does seem like a long and tedious process, and it is...but it is worth it for top quality finish and reduce the chance of permanent damage to the figure.

Super Glue3.JPG

It looks pretty gross...stretching it off the various parts.

Super glue4.JPG

After removing the paint and glue from the pieces, I submerged the pieces into a soap water bath. For this jar, I used Lemon Scented dish soap, about 2 tablespoons in warm water, and stirred with a spoon so that bubbles would not form. The pieces then settled and soaked for about an hour to neutralize and remove any acetone. I rinsed them with warm water afterwards.

Soap bath.JPG

After the pieces dried, I started painting the pieces, based on the Pawniard official artwork:

PawniardOfficial.png

I started with the body. I put the body on toothpick "stilts" while clamped by a Binder Clip and also put toothpicks in the arm sockets to keep paint from filling them as I worked. I used a Gunmetal colored paint for the body.

paint start.JPG

The other parts, the limbs and blades, were also placed in makeshift clamps with flat toothpicks, and Binder Clips, but I forgot to take pictures. ^^;;
By using the toothpicks and Binder Clips, it helps to create a stable clamp that I can use to paint the pieces with great precision. There is also a small "crack" in the desk segments where I am working, and putting the Binder Clip's steel handles into that crack, and the figures are secure to stand and dry without tipping over.
After the body was fully painted, I then moved on to painting the face piece. I started with the black portion to be the outline. Then the Yellow for the inner eye.

face3
face2

After the initial eye painting was done, I added a light silver paint for the "face plate" of the Pawniard, and to the "axe" head blade.

face3

I also used a metallic white paint for the blade's edge and also used the same metallic white on the toes and hand "blades" on the arms...forgot to take pictures of those too. Sorry. ^^;;
And I added pupils to the eyes after the paint dried on the face piece. I then started to re-assemble the Pawniard and instead of Super Glue, I use this product called "Mod Podge Three-Dimensional Magic". It is generally used to make jewelry, or beveled textures to scrap book projects. It also acts as a great, clear drying sealant for soft plastic toys and figures. It does take about 3-hours to completely dry and seal, but the results are best for these kinds of figures. Super Glue can actually damage plastics and cause marring on the surface, and distort paint.

Assembly Start

I already had the face sealed on with the Mod Podge in this image. Pawniard looks nervous. ^^ After each part has been attached and sealed, I then painted a finishing coat to harden and permanently seal the figure and the paint completely. I like using the Tamiya X-22 acrylic finish.

Tamiya X22

Keep in mind, when using clear coat finishes, you need to work in a warm dry space so that it can dry evenly, and only apply coats as directed on the jars. Having circulating fans can also help with even drying of finish coats. If not, the finish will not dry evenly, and can be sticky/tacky, and soft to the touch, leaving fingerprints on the finish, or allowing dust or hair to coat the outside of the figure, ruining all of your work. Patience is key when working with these Clear Coats, and the end results are worth the wait and work.

Finished/After
PawniardOfficial.png

I think it turned out very nicely! Could almost pass as an official figure, I think! Maybe I'm giving myself too much credit, but I do take pride in my work as an artist. :) Generally speaking, this deconstruction, repaint, and reconstruction took about a full 7-day week.

If there are others interested in the repair or reconstruction of their old figures, or fake figures that they find, feel free to ask any questions, or use my reconstruction posts as a reference for your own projects! I hope to provide more posts to show all kinds of things you can do to repair, or even customize figures to your own desires!

I will post more soon!